Interest groups at risk in MP clear-out

Whichever party gains the most seats in the forthcoming general election, there is certain to be a higher proportion of new MPs in the House of Commons than for many years. While some current MPs have come to the end of their working lives and look forward to deserved retirements, the turnover in our political representation is also a direct consequence of the expenses scandal. The general public will widely regard this as a good thing: a positive outcome from a sleazy episode, which can restore some integrity in politics.

But another consequence of a large clear out of MPs will be the damage that it will do to specialist interest pressure groups, whether in health, manufacturing, biotech or any specialist sector, who may suddenly find themselves without the core of the support that has driven their lobbying and campaigning for years.

Worse still, if the interest group’s focus is of a historical nature, the new intake may not even be aware of the issue. Take my beloved Cyprus, for example, whose invasion by Turkey occurred in 1974. In order to have been alive at the time, an incoming MP would have to be 35. To have been aware of the implications and political backdrop of the tragedy, MPs would be old enough now to start thinking of retirement!

Such is the situation that those of us seeking an end to the Cyprus problem may soon face, as will other interest groups. But another common characteristic of such campaigning and lobbying bodies is that the reason they still exist is because the passion for their respective causes has not diminished over time.

Political change normally occurs at a glacial pace. But occasionally, something happens which changes the way we view the world and how we react to it. For Cyprus, and other interest groups, this is such a change. And the reaction must be to return to look at what it is that drives us to campaign. In the case of Cyprus it is social justice, the removal of foreign troops, a regard for international law and the chance for families to return to their homes and rebuild their lives.

We must go back to basics, restate the principles and reasoning behind our issue and present them anew, articulating them to new audiences who may know nothing and whose familiarity must not be assumed. It will represent a challenge, but this is no bad thing, for it is easy to persist with stale approaches when campaigning over a long time. If Parliament is to change, so must the approach of specialist interest groups.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s